Portfolio Planning

While we’ve all been busy stuffing our face full of food over this holiday break, I’ve found a sure-fire way to procrastinate thesis writing! As I look forward to graduating with my masters in May, it was time to dust off those scrap-booking skills and get to work on my portfolio. Here’s my step by step guide to a flawless “visual resume”.

Step One: Resume – update your experiences and decide what aspects of your career you would like to highlight! This might be the most important step. I found that it was helpful to print out a copy of my resume and brainstorm ideas of how I could visually represent the different projects I had completed. Here’s my: Professional Resume

Step Two: Visuals – for my portfolio I went with short writing samples (such as blogs) and focused on images, pictures, brochures, etc that brought my resume to life! Below is an example of a page that is paired with a visual of an exhibit logo. I put the image together in a PDF so that it shows the work I did in Exhibition Development at the Field Museum.

Picture 1

The top photo is of the interns I supervised in a summative evaluation project, the middle photo is of a Xoom tablet that I helped to beta-test new timing and tracking technology on, and the bottom photo is a map of the Restoring Earth exhibit that was the institution’s focus gallery for evaluation.

Step Three: Materials – After you have your images ready and printed (I went for a semi-gloss paper and high quality print at OfficeMax), it’s time to gather your supplies! I shopped at JoAnn Fabrics in the scrapbook section for a leather-bound portfolio book, acid-free paper, and acid-free adhesive stickers. I also found that a pencil, ruler, and scissors came in handy.

A flat surface and the ability to spread out was essential for me! I put all images in the order I envisioned them before beginning to assemble.

A flat surface and the ability to spread out was essential for me! I put all images in the order I envisioned them before beginning to assemble. I decided to use a 12X12 portfolio and mount on black cardstock to really make the images pop.

Step Four: Assembling – Who knew that putting together a scrapbook could be so complicated?! Or that I would need a screw driver! Good thing museum studies students are always prepared.

Finished product! This page highlights my professional blog and the work that I did designed a program at the Farmers Museum with Pathfinder Village, a school for students with developmental disabilities.

Finished product! This page highlights my professional blog and the work that I did designing a program at the Farmers Museum with Pathfinder Village, a school for students with developmental disabilities. I made sure to include pictures of myself (for which I have consent) and evidence of the projects I completed.

Step Five: Final touches – For my portfolio, I chose to include blank pages at the end for additions that I will make in the upcoming year. I also included a business card near the beginning, and had fun adding in small personal details (and riding the fine line between being too “scrap-bookie” and being plain old boring). Overall, I was pleased with the outcome! Hopefully I can put it to good use soon!

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The last pages highlight my work as an intern at the New York State Historical Association. The bottom right postcard is an advertisement for the Native American interpretive site that I will be helping to evaluate in the Spring.

 

 

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About catebay

Informal educator working in the world of art. Interests in public programming and community advocacy. Loves learning about people, collecting blue mason jars, and consuming Swedish fish.
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One Response to Portfolio Planning

  1. amersfoort7 says:

    Nice work Cate! I knew you couldn’t help yourself and wait to do this portfolio…LOL Maria 🙂

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